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ABOUT THE GIFT

Lord Stanley’s

GIFT TO CANADA

THE MAN BEHIND THE GIFT

On March 18, 1892, at a victory celebration for the Ottawa Hockey Club held in Russell House—a hotel that stood in what is now Confederation Square—Lord Stanley of Preston, Canada’s sixth governor general, made that pledge to the game and country he had grown to love.

Lord Stanley’s gift immediately became recognized as hockey’s ultimate prize, and would soon become a revered symbol of excellence in team sports.

In 2017—125 years later—Canadians raised a monument steps away from the place at which Lord Stanley made his historic pledge. The monument honours his original gift and the supreme expression of athletic excellence the Stanley Cup has become to hockey fans the world over.

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EXPERIENCE THE MONUMENT

The Lord Stanley’s Gift monument is located at the corner of Sparks Street and Elgin Street in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada—mere steps away from the very spot where Lord Stanley made his famous pledge on a winter evening in 1892.

An essential part of the monument is the 36 discs on which are inscribed the names of teams that have won the Stanley Cup. The 16 polished pucks identify winners from 1893 to 1926, when the Stanley Cup was regarded as a challenge cup. The 20 mirror-finished pucks list winners from 1927 to 2017, the period in which the Stanley Cup was awarded to the winner of the National Hockey League playoffs.

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125 YEARS OF GLORY

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Stanley Cup team & game

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Anaheim Ducks

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Founded in 1993 by The Walt Disney Company

Founded in 1993 by The Walt Disney Company, the franchise began the 1993–94 NHL season as the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim, a name inspired by the 1992 Disney movie The Mighty Ducks. The team was renamed Anaheim Ducks in 2005.

ANAHEIM DUCKS VS. OTTAWA SENATORS

The Anaheim Ducks defeat the Ottawa Senators in five games to claim the team’s first Stanley Cup title. Ducks defenceman Scott Niedermayer is awarded the Conn Smythe Trophy as MVP of the playoffs. The Ducks are the first team based in California to win the Stanley Cup, and the first West Coast team to capture the Cup since the Victoria Cougars in 1925.

 

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Boston Bruins

third-oldest franchise in the NHL

Founded in 1924, the Boston Bruins are the third-oldest franchise in the National Hockey League and the oldest American franchise in the league. Some of the greatest players in hockey history, including Eddie Shore, Milt Schmidt, Phil Esposito, Bobby Orr and Raymond Bourque, donned the Bruins sweater.

BOSTON BRUINS VS. NEW YORK RANGERS

The Bruins defeat the defending champion New York Rangers to claim their first Stanley Cup title. The final round is a best-of-three series, which the Bruins sweep. The series is the first time two American teams meet in the final round.

BOSTON BRUINS VS. TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS

The Bruins win their second Stanley Cup title, defeating the Toronto Maple Leafs in five games in the final round. The year is the first in which the final round of the Stanley Cup playoffs is a best-of-seven affair and the last time the Cup champion has its playoff game scores engraved on the Cup. Facing the New York Rangers in the semi-final round, Bruins forward Mel Hill scores three overtime goals, earning him the nickname “Sudden Death.”

BOSTON BRUINS VS. DETROIT RED WINGS

The Bruins win their third Stanley Cup title, sweeping the Detroit Red Wings in the best-of-seven final-round series. Boston would go 29 years before winning the Cup again.

BOSTON BRUINS VS. ST. LOUIS BLUES

The Bruins win the Stanley Cup for the first time in 29 years, sweeping the St. Louis Blues in the final round. The series is most remembered for Bobby Orr’s spectacular Cup-winning goal on May 10, scored after a mere 40 seconds are gone in the first overtime period of game four. Orr earns the Conn Smythe Trophy as MVP of the playoffs.

BOSTON BRUINS VS. NEW YORK RANGERS

The Bruins win their second Stanley Cup in three years, defeating the New York Rangers in six games in the final round. Bruins defenceman Bobby Orr is awarded the Conn Smythe Trophy as MVP of the playoffs—taking home the trophy for the second time in his illustrious career.

BOSTON BRUINS VS. VANCOUVER CANUCKS

The Bruins win the Stanley Cup for the sixth time in team history, defeating the Vancouver Canucks in seven games in the final round. The victory ends a 39-year Stanley Cup drought for the Bruins. Bruins goaltender Tim Thomas earns the Conn Smythe Trophy as MVP of the playoffs.

 

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Calgary Flames

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first Calgary team to compete for the Stanley Cup

The Calgary Flames franchise was founded in 1972 as the Atlanta Flames. The team moved to Calgary in 1980. In 1986, the Flames took on the Montreal Canadiens in the Stanley Cup final, becoming the first Calgary team to compete for the Stanley Cup since 1923, when the Calgary Tigers of the West Coast Hockey League lost to the Montreal Canadiens.

CALGARY FLAMES VS. MONTREAL CANADIENS

The Flames defeat the Montreal Canadiens in six games to win the Stanley Cup. The game-six victory by the Flames marks the only time an opposing team has hoisted the Stanley Cup at the fabled Montreal Forum. Flames defenceman Al MacInnis earns the Conn Smythe Trophy as MVP of the playoffs. Team co-owner Sonia Scurfield is the only Canadian woman to have her name engraved on the Cup.

 

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Carolina Hurricanes

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followed a long and winding journey to Stanley Cup glory

The Carolina Hurricanes followed a long and winding journey to Stanley Cup glory. The franchise was formed way back in 1971 as the New England Whalers of the World Hockey Association. The club joined the National Hockey League in 1979, when four teams from that fledging league merged with the NHL. Once in the NHL, the team became known as the Hartford Whalers, until it relocated to Raleigh, North Carolina in 1997 and assumed its current name. Hockey legends Gordie Howe (in 1980), Bobby Hull (also in 1980) and Dave Keon (in 1982) all played their final NHL games with the franchise.

CAROLINA HURRICANES VS. EDMONTON OILERS

The Carolina Hurricanes defeat the Edmonton Oilers in seven games to claim the team’s first and only Stanley Cup title. Hurricanes goalie Cam Ward is awarded the Conn Smythe Trophy as MVP of the playoffs, just the fourth rookie to earn the honour.

 

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Chicago Blackhawks

Some of the greatest players in hockey history

Founded in 1926, the Chicago Blackhawks (spelled Black Hawks until 1986) are one of the Original Six teams in the National Hockey League. Some of the greatest players in hockey history, including Bobby Hull, Glenn Hall, Stan Mikita, Chuck Gardiner and Tony Esposito, donned the Blackhawks sweater.

Vs Detroit Red Wings

The Blackhawks win their first Stanley Cup title, beating the Detroit Red Wings in four games in the best-of-five final-round series. Harold “Mush” March scores the Cup-winning goal during the second overtime period of game four. Blackhawks goalie Chuck Gardiner would become the only goaltender to be recognized on the Stanley Cup as his team’s captain. Gardiner would die in the off-season, the victim of a brain hemorrhage brought on by a tonsil infection that had plagued him throughout the season.

VS TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS

The Blackhawks win their second Stanley Cup title, defeating the Toronto Maple Leafs in four games in the best-of-five final-round series. The team would wait 23 years before hoisting the Cup again.

Vs Detroit Red Wings

The Blackhawks win their third Stanley Cup title, and their first since 1938, defeating the Detroit Red Wings in six games in the final round of the playoffs. In knocking off the Montreal Canadiens in the semi-final round, the Blackhawks end Montreal’s record-setting five-season run as Cup champions. Chicago waits 49 years for its next Cup win. The 1961 Cup victory by the Blackhawks is the only time during the Original Six era (1942 to 1967) in which the Cup is not claimed by one of the Montreal Canadiens, Detroit Red Wings or Toronto Maple Leafs. Turns out the Original Six is more like the Big Three.

VS Philadelphia Flyers

The Blackhawks defeat the Philadelphia Flyers in six games in the final round of the playoffs to win the Stanley Cup for the first time since 1961. The victory ends nearly 50 years of futility—the longest Stanley Cup drought at the time. Blackhawks captain Jonathan Toews takes home the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP.

VS Boston Bruins

The Blackhawks defeat the Boston Bruins in six games in the final round of the playoffs to win the Stanley Cup for the second time in four seasons. The showdown between the Blackhawks and Bruins marks the first time ever that the teams have played each other in the Cup final—a remarkably rare occurrence for two teams that have been in the NHL for more than 80 years. Blackhawks forward Patrick Kane wins the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP.

VS Tampa Bay

The Blackhawks win their third Stanley Cup in six seasons, defeating the Tampa Bay Lightning in six games in the final round of the playoffs. Blackhawks defenceman Duncan Keith is awarded the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP.

 

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Colorado Avalanche

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one of the 12 original teams

The Colorado Avalanche franchise has a surprisingly long history. The team was founded back in 1972 as the Quebec Nordiques, one of the 12 original teams of the World Hockey Association. The club joined the National Hockey League as a result of the WHA–NHL merger in 1979. The team then relocated to Denver, Colorado following the 1994–95 season. Hockey fans in Quebec City won’t want to hear this bit of news, but the 1996 Stanley Cup victory by the Avalanche is the first time a team wins the Cup in its first year after being relocated to a new city.

COLORADO AVALANCHE VS. FLORIDA PANTHERS

In its first year in Denver, the Colorado Avalanche wins the Stanley Cup, sweeping the Florida Panthers in the final round. Defenceman Uwe Krupp scores the Cup-winning goal in the third overtime period of game four. Avalanche captain Joe Sakic takes home the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP.

COLORADO AVALANCHE VS. NEW JERSEY DEVILS

The Avalanche wins its second Stanley Cup in franchise history, defeating the defending Cup champion New Jersey Devils in seven games in the final playoff round. While Avalanche goalie Patrick Roy earns the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP, the victory celebration is most notable for the sight of Avalanche defenceman Raymond Bourque hoisting the Cup high for the first and only time in his illustrious 23-year career.

 

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Dallas Stars

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ORIGINALLY the Minnesota North Stars

The Dallas Stars joined the National Hockey League as part of the league’s expansion from six to 12 teams in 1967. But the club didn’t start in Dallas. The franchise was located originally in Bloomington, Minnesota and was named the Minnesota North Stars. Facing financial difficulty, both the North Stars and Cleveland Barons merged in 1978, with the new team continuing in Bloomington as the North Stars. The Minnesota North Stars made it to the Stanley Cup final twice, losing in 1981 to the New York Islanders and in 1991 to the Pittsburgh Penguins. The club made the move to the Lone Star State to start the 1993–94 NHL season.

DALLAS STARS VS. NEW JERSEY DEVILS

Brett Hull scores a controversial goal in the third overtime period of game six to clinch the Stanley Cup for the Stars over the Buffalo Sabres. The controversy stems from the complexity of the so-called crease rule. Stars forward Joe Nieuwendyk takes home the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP. The team reach the Cup final again the next year, this time bowing to the New Jersey Devils in six games.

 

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Detroit Red Wings

the Red Wings have won the Stanley Cup 11 times

Founded in 1926, the Detroit franchise was known first as the Cougars (until 1930) and then the Falcons (in 1931 and 1932) before changing to the Red Wings to start the 1932–33 season. Since then, the Red Wings have won the Stanley Cup 11 times, the most by any team based in the United States. Detroit Red Wings also qualified for the NHL playoffs each season from 1990–91 to 2015–16, a remarkable 25 consecutive seasons. Along with a winning tradition, many legends of the game—including Gordie Howe, Ted Lindsay, Terry Sawchuk and Steve Yzerman—have worn the Red Wings sweater, which is adorned with the winged-wheel logo, one of the most iconic designs in North American professional sports.

DETROIT RED WINGS VS. MONTREAL MAROONS

Detroit defeats the Toronto Maple Leafs in five games in the five-game final-round series to win the Stanley Cup for the first time. During the semi-final round against the Montreal Maroons, Detroit rookie Modere “Mud” Bruneteau scores the overtime winner to end the longest game in Stanley Cup playoff history: 176 minutes and 30 seconds of total playing time.

DETROIT RED WINGS VS. NEW YORK RANGERS

Detroit defeats the New York Rangers in five games in the five-game final-round series to win the Stanley Cup for the second straight season. It marks the first time an American NHL team wins back-to-back Cups.

DETROIT RED WINGS VS. BOSTON BRUINS

Detroit sweeps the Boston Bruins in the final round to win the Stanley Cup. The Red Wings not only win, but also rebound from a heartbreaking final-round loss to the Toronto Maple Leafs the year before, which saw the Leafs win in seven games after being down three games to none.

DETROIT RED WINGS VS. NEW YORK RANGERS

The Red Wings defeat the New York Rangers in seven games in the final round to win the Stanley Cup. Pete Babando is the hero for Detroit, scoring in the second overtime period of the seventh game. During the Cup final, the Rangers play all their home games in Toronto. The reason: a circus was being held in Madison Square Garden, the Rangers legendary home rink.

DETROIT RED WINGS VS. TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS

Detroit sweeps its way to the Stanley Cup, dispatching the Toronto Maple Leafs and Montreal Canadiens in the minimum total of eight games. Red Wings goalie Terry Sawchuk matches an NHL playoff record by notching four shutouts.

DETROIT RED WINGS VS. MONTREAL CANADIENS

The Red Wings defeat the Montreal Canadiens in seven games of the final playoff round to win the Stanley Cup. Detroit’s Tony Leswick is the hero, scoring the series winner in overtime of the seventh game.

DETROIT RED WINGS VS. MONTREAL CANADIENS

Gordie Howe scores a playoff-record 20 points as the Red Wings triumph over the Montreal Canadiens in seven games in the final round to take home the Stanley Cup. The Cup win is the club’s second straight and fourth in six years. The Red Wings would go four decades before tasting Cup triumph again.

DETROIT RED WINGS VS. PHILADELPHIA FLYERS

The Red Wings sweep the Philadelphia Flyers in the final round of the playoffs to win the club’s first Stanley Cup title in 42 years. Detroit goalie Mike Vernon earns the Conn Smythe Trophy as MVP of the playoffs.

DETROIT RED WINGS VS. WASHINGTON CAPITALS

The Red Wings sweep the Washington Capitals in the final round of the playoffs to clinch the Stanley Cup—the team’s second straight Cup win. It’s also the eighth Cup win for Detroit coach Scotty Bowman, tying the record set by Montreal Canadiens bench boss Toe Blake. Red Wings captain Steve Yzerman takes home the Conn Smythe Trophy as MVP of the playoffs.

DETROIT RED WINGS VS. CAROLINA HURRICANES

Detroit defeats the Carolina Hurricanes in five games to win the Stanley Cup. The Red Wings are competing in their twenty-second Cup final, while the Hurricanes are playing in their first. The Cup victory is the ninth for Detroit coach Scotty Bowman, breaking the record he held with Montreal Canadiens coach Toe Blake. Red Wings defenceman Niklas Lidstrom is awarded the Conn Smythe Trophy as MVP of the playoffs.

DETROIT RED WINGS VS. PITTSBURGH PENGUINS

The Red Wings beat the Pittsburgh Penguins in six games in the final round of the playoffs to take home the Stanley Cup. Red Wings forward Henrik Zetterberg is awarded the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP.

 

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Edmonton Oilers

One of the 12 founding franchises

Starting play in 1972, the Edmonton Oilers were one of the 12 founding franchises of the World Hockey Association. The club was also one of four teams that survived the merger of the WHA with the National Hockey League to start the 1979–80 season. Within the next 11 seasons, the Oilers would win the Stanley Cup five times.

EDMONTON OILERS VS. NEW YORK ISLANDERS

In a rematch of the previous year’s Cup final, the Oilers get the better of the defending champion New York Islanders, defeating the Isles in five games. The Oilers not only gain a measure of revenge on the Islanders, but also end the New Yorkers four-year hold on the Cup and begin a dynastic run of their own—winning the Cup five times in seven seasons. Oilers forward Mark Messier is named winner of the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP. The name of Basil Pocklington—father of Oilers owner Peter Pocklington—is engraved on the Stanley Cup following the team’s win in 1984 and soon after covered over. The incident leads the National Hockey League and Hockey Hall of Fame to adopt rules to govern which names of the championship team would be eligible to be engraved on the Cup.

EDMONTON OILERS VS. PHILADELPHIA FLYERS

The Oilers defend the Cup, clinching the title with a five-game series win over the Philadelphia Flyers. Edmonton loses a mere three games in its run to the title. Team captain Wayne Gretzky, who sets single-season playoff records for assists and points, takes home the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP.

EDMONTON OILERS VS. CALGARY FLAMES

The Oilers regain the Stanley Cup, after falling in the second round of the 1986 playoffs to the Calgary Flames. This year, the Oilers again defeat the Philadelphia Flyers in the final round—this time in a thrilling seven-game series. Flyers goalie Ron Hextall is awarded the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP—the fourth time the trophy goes to a player whose team did not win the Cup.

EDMONTON OILERS VS. BOSTON BRUINS

The Oilers win the Stanley Cup for a fourth time in five seasons, triumphing over the Boston Bruins in four games in the final round. Game four of the final round is suspended and eventually replayed in Edmonton when the power goes out at Boston Garden during the second period. Team captain Wayne Gretzky takes home the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP for the second time.

EDMONTON OILERS VS. BOSTON BRUINS

The Oilers win the Stanley Cup for the fifth time in seven seasons, defeating the Boston Bruins in five games in the final round. Game one of the series remains the longest game in Stanley Cup final history. It ends when Oilers forward Petr Klima scores in the third overtime period. Oilers goalie Bill Ranford earns the Conn Smythe Trophy as MVP of the playoffs.

 

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Kenora Thistles

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Humble Yet Mighty Kenora Thistles

Professional hockey wasn’t always the big business it is today. Case in point: the humble yet mighty Kenora Thistles. Hailing from a town of just 4,000 people, the Thistles were a hockey power for a few fleeting years in the first decade of the twentieth century, challenging for the Stanley Cup three times and winning once.

VS Montreal Wanderers

In January, the Thistles defeat the defending Stanley Cup champion Montreal Wanderers in a two-game total-goals series. Kenora had challenged—and lost to—the defending Stanley Cup champions twice (in 1903 and 1905) before winning the Cup in 1907. The Kenora team would lose a rematch and the Cup to the Wanderers a mere two months later.

 

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Los Angeles Kings

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The Kings were one of two California teams to join the NHL

The Los Angeles Kings are one of the six teams that joined the National Hockey League as part of the league’s expansion from six to 12 teams in 1967. The Kings were one of two California teams to join the NHL to start the 1967–68 season, the other being the short-lived Oakland-based California Seals.

LOS ANGELES KINGS VS. NEW JERSEY DEVILS

The Kings defeat the New Jersey Devils in six games to capture the club’s first Stanley Cup title. Kings goaltender Jonathan Quick takes home the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP.

LOS ANGELES KINGS VS. SAN JOSE SHARKS

Defenceman Alec Martinez scores in the second overtime period of game five to clinch the Cup for the Kings—the team’s second Stanley Cup triumph in three years. The win capped a heroic playoff run by the team, which included overcoming a three-games-to-none deficit in the opening round against the San Jose Sharks. Kings forward Justin Williams is named winner of the Conn Smythe Trophy as MVP of the playoffs.

 

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Montreal Canadiens

most successful team in North American professional hockey

Montreal Canadiens are simply the most successful team in North American professional hockey and one of the most successful teams in any professional sport anywhere. Founded in 1909 as “Le club de hockey Canadien,” the team has hoisted hockey’s Holy Grail a record 24 times. The closest team is the Toronto Maple Leafs, far behind with 11 Cup victories. The Canadiens also hold the record for most consecutive Cup wins, capturing the title five straight seasons from 1955–56 to 1959–60. Equally impressive, the club won the Cup at least once in each decade from the 1910s to the 1990s—the only team to do so. Needless to say, many of the greatest players in hockey history—including Howie Morenz, Maurice Richard, Jacques Plante, Doug Harvey, Jean Béliveau, Guy Lafleur and Larry Robinson—donned the bleu-blanc-rouge sweater of the Canadiens.

MONTREAL CANADIENS VS. PORTLAND ROSEBUDS

The Canadiens beat the Portland Rosebuds in a five-game series to win the Stanley Cup. It’s a year of firsts—the first Cup win for the Canadiens in franchise history; the first time a five-game series goes the distance; and the first time an American team plays for the Stanley Cup.

MONTREAL CANADIENS VS. CALGARY TIGERS

The Canadiens beat the Calgary Tigers of the West Coast Hockey League in a two-game series to take the Stanley Cup. The Cup victory is the team’s first as a member of the National Hockey League. Rookie Howie Morenz is a standout for the Montrealers, scoring seven goals in six playoff games.

MONTREAL CANADIENS VS. BOSTON BRUINS

The Canadiens win the Stanley Cup, upsetting the Boston Bruins in a two-game series. The Bruins entered the post-season with a 38-5-1 record and had beaten the Canadiens in all four of their regular season match-ups.

MONTREAL CANADIENS VS. CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS

The Canadiens win the Stanley Cup in five games in a best-of-five final round series against the Chicago Blackhawks. The victory marks the first time a National Hockey League team wins consecutive Stanley Cups.

MONTREAL CANADIENS VS. TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS

Montreal sweeps the Chicago Blackhawks in the final round to capture the Stanley Cup. However, the most memorable game of the playoffs that year occurs on March 23 in Montreal in a semi-final win over the Toronto Maple Leafs, as Maurice Richard scores all five goals in a Canadiens victory. The Rocket scores three goals in the second period and two more in the third, with line-mate Hector “Toe” Blake assisting on each goal.

MONTREAL CANADIENS VS. BOSTON BRUINS

The Canadiens beat the Boston Bruins in five games to win the Stanley Cup. Three of the games are decided in overtime, including the first, in which Maurice Richard scores the first of what would turn out to be a record six career playoff overtime goals.

MONTREAL CANADIENS VS. BOSTON BRUINS

The Canadiens beat the Boston Bruins in a five-game final-round series to take home the Stanley Cup. Montreal’s Elmer Lach scores the Cup-winning goal in overtime of game five. It’s the third and final Cup victory for Lach, who retires at the end of the following season as the National Hockey League’s all-time leading scorer.

MONTREAL CANADIENS VS. DETROIT RED WINGS

Montreal wins the first of what would turn out to be five consecutive Stanley Cup titles, this time defeating the defending Cup champion Detroit Red Wings in five games in the final round. Montreal forward Jean Béliveau leads the way, scoring 12 goals, seven of them against the Red Wings. Leading up to the final series, the Canadiens defeat the New York Rangers 4-1 in the semi-final round. In the final game of the series, the Canadiens shut out the Rangers 7-0, with Maurice Richard chalking up five assists.

MONTREAL CANADIENS VS. BOSTON BRUINS

The Canadiens win their second straight Stanley Cup title, defeating the Boston Bruins in five games in the final round. Maurice Richard scores four times in game one to lead his team to victory.

MONTREAL CANADIENS VS. BOSTON BRUINS

Montreal wins its third straight Stanley Cup title, defeating the Boston Bruins in a six-game series. It is the second consecutive year that Montreal defeats Boston in the final round.

MONTREAL CANADIENS VS. TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS

Montreal beats the Toronto Maple Leafs in a five-game series to claim the team’s fourth straight Stanley Cup title. It marks the first time any team wins the Cup four straight seasons.

MONTREAL CANADIENS VS. CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS

The Canadiens sweep their way to the Stanley Cup, beating the Chicago Blackhawks in the semi-final round and the Toronto Maple Leafs in the final. The Cup win is the fifth in a row for the Montrealers—still the only squad to achieve this feat—and the tenth consecutive year the team reaches the final round.

MONTREAL CANADIENS VS. CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS

Montreal defeats the Chicago Blackhawks in a gruelling seven-game series to take home the Stanley Cup. Canadiens legend Jean Béliveau earns the Conn Smythe Trophy as MVP of the playoffs. It is the first time the trophy is awarded.

MONTREAL CANADIENS VS. DETROIT RED WINGS

Montreal defeats the Detroit Red Wings in six games in the final round to win the second of back-to-back Stanley Cup titles. Detroit goaltender Roger Crozier is awarded the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP, the first time the trophy is awarded to a player whose team does not win the Cup.

MONTREAL CANADIENS VS. ST. LOUIS BLUES

The Canadiens sweep the St. Louis Blues to take the Stanley Cup. Montreal loses just once in 13 playoff games. Following the Cup-clinching game, Toe Blake retires, having coached the Canadiens to eight Cup victories.

MONTREAL CANADIENS VS. ST. LOUIS BLUES

Montreal beats the St. Louis Blues in the final round of the playoffs for the second straight season, again sweeping the Blues in four games. Canadiens defenceman Serge Savard wins the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP, the first time a blueliner takes home the honour.

MONTREAL CANADIENS VS. CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS

Montreal defeats the Chicago Blackhawks in a thrilling seven-game final-round series to win the Stanley Cup. Following the victory, Jean Béliveau retires as a 10-time Stanley Cup champion, while teammate and rookie netminder Ken Dryden is awarded the Conn Smythe Trophy as MVP of the playoffs.

MONTREAL CANADIENS VS. CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS

Montreal defeats the Chicago Blackhawks in a six-game final round to capture the Stanley Cup. Canadiens captain Henri Richard wins the Cup for a record eleventh time, while teammate Yvan Cournoyer earns the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP.

MONTREAL CANADIENS VS. PHILADELPHIA FLYERS

In a match-up portrayed as skill versus brawn, skill wins out as the Canadiens sweep the Philadelphia Flyers in the final round of the playoffs to capture the Stanley Cup. Despite the loss, Philadelphia winger Reggie Leach, who scores a playoff record 19 goals, is awarded the Conn Smythe Trophy as MVP of the playoffs.

MONTREAL CANADIENS VS. BOSTON BRUINS

The Canadiens win the team’s second straight Stanley Cup title, sweeping the Boston Bruins in the final round. With the Cup win, Canadiens winger Guy Lafleur caps a remarkable season, winning the Hart (most valuable player), Pearson (most valuable player, as judged by NHL players) and Art Ross (leading scorer) trophies, as well as the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP.

MONTREAL CANADIENS VS. BOSTON BRUINS

The Canadiens capture the team’s third straight Stanley Cup crown, defeating the Boston Bruins in six games in the final round. Montreal defenceman Larry Robinson is both a pillar of strength and a scoring threat on the blueline, notching 21 points in 15 games to win the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP.

MONTREAL CANADIENS VS. NEW YORK RANGERS

Montreal defeats the New York Rangers in five games in the final round to win the Stanley Cup for the fourth consecutive season. Canadiens forward and defensive specialist Bob Gainey earns the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP.

MONTREAL CANADIENS VS. CALGARY FLAMES

Montreal claims yet another Stanley Cup title, beating the Calgary Flames in five games in the final round of the playoffs. Ten rookies help propel the Canadiens to the Cup, including 20-year-old netminder Patrick Roy, who is awarded the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP.

MONTREAL CANADIENS VS. LOS ANGELES KINGS

Montreal defeats the Los Angeles Kings in five games in the final playoff round to win the Stanley Cup for the 24th time. The Canadiens win 10 playoff games in overtime en route to the Cup, including three against the Kings. Montreal goalie Patrick Roy is awarded the Conn Smythe Trophy as MVP of the playoffs, his second such award.

 

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Montreal Hockey Club

The first stanley cup dynasty

Formed in 1886, the hockey team of the Montreal Amateur Athletic Association—known simply as the Montreal Hockey Club—could rightly be considered the first Stanley Cup dynasty. The team would win the Cup four times in the first decade of the trophy’s existence. The Montrealers continued to play as an amateur squad long after the team’s heyday as multiple winners of the Stanley Cup, capturing amateur hockey’s Allan Cup in 1930. The team ceased play in 1932.

1st in the Amateur Hockey Association of Canada

The Montreal Amateur Athletic Association places first in the Amateur Hockey Association of Canada standings and is awarded the Stanley Cup (then known as the Dominion Hockey Challenge Cup).

the first Stanley Cup dynasty

The Montreal Amateur Athletic Association wins a three-team playoff round to capture the Stanley Cup. The playoff round is held after four teams (the Quebec Hockey Club would not participate) tie for top spot in the Amateur Hockey Association of Canada standings.

VS Winnipeg Victorias

The Montreal Amateur Athletic Association defeats the Winnipeg Victorias in three games in a best-of-three series to win the Stanley Cup. The match-up comes about when Montreal, champion of the Canadian Amateur Hockey League, challenges the defending Stanley Cup champion from Winnipeg.

VS Winnipeg Victorias

In late January and early February, Montreal defends its Stanley Cup title, defeating the Winnipeg Victorias in three games in a best-of-three series. The series actually takes four games, as the second game is suspended after 27 minutes of overtime, without a winner being determined. The tie game is discarded.

 

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Montreal Maroons

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Canada’s so-called Two Solitudes

Canada’s so-called Two Solitudes were evident even on the ice. Established in 1924, the Montreal Maroons were considered the city’s English team, while the rival Canadiens were considered the city’s French team. The Maroons suspended play in 1938 and folded officially in 1947.

MONTREAL VS. VICTORIA COUGARS

Montreal defeats the Victoria Cougars in four games in a best-of-five series to win the Stanley Cup. Maroons goalie Clint Benedict records three shutouts in the series. It’s the first Cup triumph for the Maroons. The Western Hockey League folds soon after the Cup final, making the Cougars the last team not from the National Hockey League to compete for the Cup.

MONTREAL VS. TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS

Montreal sweeps the Toronto Maple Leafs in a best-of-five final round to win the Stanley Cup. Maroons coach Tommy Gorman becomes the only coach to win successive Cup titles behind the bench of two different teams. With the club’s Cup win in 1935, the Maroons are the last non-Original Six franchise to win the Stanley Cup until the expansion Philadelphia Flyers claim the Cup in 1974.

 

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Montreal Shamrocks

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Founded in 1886

Founded in 1886 at a meeting of the Shamrock Lacrosse Club, the Montreal Shamrocks would go on to compete in several leagues as both an amateur and professional squad. The team would play its final 11 seasons as part of the Montreal City Hockey League, folding after the 1923–24 season.

FINISHING ATOP THE CANADIAN AMATEUR HOCKEY LEAGUE

The Shamrocks claim the Stanley Cup by finishing atop the Canadian Amateur Hockey League standings in what is the league’s first season. Days later, the team would defend its title, defeating Queen’s University in a single-game challenge.

SHAMROCKS VS. WINNIPEG VICTORIAS

In February, the Shamrocks defend their Stanley Cup championship, defeating the Winnipeg Victorias in three games in a best-of-three series. The following month, the Shamrocks not only fend off a challenge by the Halifax Crescents (the only time a team from that city would challenge for the Cup), but also finish first in the Canadian Amateur Hockey League standings. The Victorias would get their revenge, challenging and defeating the Shamrocks in January 1901 to claim the Cup.

 

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Montreal Victorias

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one of the oldest organized hockey clubs

The Victoria Skating Club of Montreal dates to at least 1874. Out of the skating club emerged the Victoria Hockey Club of Montreal, making it one of the oldest organized hockey clubs, along with McGill University. The team was also an innovator, credited with introducing the round puck in 1881. Before then, the puck was square with sharp corners. The Victorias remained an amateur team throughout their existence, winning Allan Cup titles as Canada’s top amateur club in 1908 and 1929. The team ceased play in 1939.

MONTREAL VICTORIAS WIN AHAC

In March, the Victorias win the Amateur Hockey Association of Canada (AHAC) title and, with that title, the Stanley Cup. Not so fast. Trustees of the Cup rule that before this year’s AHAC champion can claim the Cup, last year’s AHAC champion, the Montreal Hockey Club, must win a challenge match against Queen’s University, the champions of the Ontario Hockey Association. The Montreal Hockey Club wins the game, enabling the Victorias (this year’s AHAC champion) to claim the Cup.

MONTREAL VICTORIAS VS. WINNIPEG VICTORIAS

In March, the Victorias win the Amateur Hockey Association of Canada title and with it the Stanley Cup. The Montreal club entered the AHAC season as Stanley Cup champion, after defeating the defending Cup champion Winnipeg Victorias in a single-game challenge on December 30, 1896.

 

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Montreal Wanderers

one of the most successful teams

Founded in 1903, the Montreal Wanderers were one of the most successful teams in the first decade of the new century. While a success, the team would live up to its nickname, playing in five different leagues in its short existence, evidence of the tumult within organized hockey during those times. The team folded in 1918, soon after the Montreal Arena—the team’s home rink—burned down. The Wanderers would wander no more.

WANDERERS VS. OTTAWA SENATORS

The Wanderers and the Ottawa Senators finish the season tied atop the Eastern Canada Amateur Hockey Association standings, resulting in a two-game total-goals series to decide the Stanley Cup champion. Montreal wins the series to end Ottawa’s three-year reign as Cup champion. The Wanderers defend their title later that year, defeating the New Glasgow Cubs in a two-game total-goals series. On December 27 of that year, five Wanderers players become the first professionals to compete for the Stanley Cup.

WANDERERS VS. KENORA THISTLES

After losing the Stanley Cup to the Kenora Thistles in January, the Wanderers regain Lord Stanley’s mug in March, topping the Thistles in a two-game total-goals series.

THE WANDERERS RETAIN THE CUP

The Wanderers beat back four challengers to the Stanley Cup, besting the Ottawa Victorias in January, Winnipeg Maple Leafs and Toronto Argonauts in March, and the Edmonton Hockey Club in December. The Wanderers also retain the Cup in March by finishing first in the Eastern Canada Amateur Hockey Association standings.

WANDERERS VS. BERLIN DUTCHMAN

The Wanderers reclaim the Stanley Cup by finishing atop the National Hockey Association standings in the NHA’s first season. Days later, Montreal would fend off a single-game challenge by the Berlin (now Kitchener) Dutchmen to retain the Cup.

 

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New Jersey Devils

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The New Jersey Devils followed a winding path

The New Jersey Devils followed a winding path across North America to reach the summit of professional hockey. The franchise was founded as the Kansas City Scouts in 1974. Two years later, the club moved to Denver, where it was renamed the Colorado Rockies. Following six years of indifferent play in the Colorado capital, the franchise journeyed cross-country to East Rutherford, New Jersey. The club now plays its home games in Newark, the state’s biggest city.

NEW JERSEY DEVILS VS. DETROIT RED WINGS

The Devils capture the franchise’s first Stanley Cup victory, capping the lockout-shortened 1994–95 season with a sweep of the Detroit Red Wings in the final playoff round. New Jersey forward Claude Lemieux is awarded the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP. The 1995 Cup-winning Devils team begins the formal tradition of allowing each player to have his own private day with the Cup.

Scott Stevens is named winner of the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP

Jason Arnott scores in the second overtime period of game six to clinch the Stanley Cup for the Devils, the team’s second in six seasons. New Jersey defenceman Scott Stevens is named winner of the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP.

NEW JERSEY DEVILS VS. ANAHEIM DUCKS

The Devils defeat the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim in seven games to win the team’s third Cup in nine seasons. Despite his team losing to New Jersey in the final round of the playoffs, Anaheim goalie Jean-Sebastien Giguere is named winner of the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP.

 

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New York Islanders

the pinnacle of hockey success within a decade

Founded in 1972, the New York Islanders would—after some trying first few seasons—skyrocket to the pinnacle of hockey success within a decade, capturing four Stanley Cup titles by 1983. Just as impressive, the Isles won 19 consecutive playoff series between 1980 and 1984. Never say never, but it’s a feat that is likely never to be matched or surpassed.

NEW YORK ISLANDERS VS. PHILADELPHIA FLYERS

The Islanders capture their first Stanley Cup title, defeating the Philadelphia Flyers in six games in the final playoff round, when forward Bob Nystrom scores in the first overtime period of game six. Islanders forward Bryan Trottier is awarded the Conn Smythe Trophy as MVP of the playoffs.

NEW YORK ISLANDERS VS. MINNESOTA NORTH STARS

The Islanders defend the Stanley Cup, defeating the Minnesota North Stars in five games in the final playoff round. The team loses only three playoff games in four series on the way to a second straight Cup title. New York forward Mike Bossy sets a playoff record with 35 points, yet it is Islanders forward Butch Goring who is awarded the Conn Smythe Trophy as MVP of the playoffs.

NEW YORK ISLANDERS VS. VANCOUVER CANUCKS

The Islanders win a third straight Stanley Cup, the only American team to do so, sweeping the Vancouver Canucks in the final round of the playoffs. Islanders forward Mike Bossy, who scores seven times in the four-game final round, is awarded the Conn Smythe Trophy as MVP of the playoffs. On a further historical note, the 1982 playoffs mark the centennial year of the Stanley Cup.

NEW YORK ISLANDERS VS. EDMONTON OILERS

The Islanders win a fourth straight Stanley Cup, sweeping the Edmonton Oilers in the final round of the playoffs. Since then, no team has won the Cup more than two consecutive times. Islanders goaltender Billy Smith is awarded the Conn Smythe Trophy as MVP of the playoffs. The Oilers gain a measure of revenge the following season, defeating the Islanders in the Cup final.

 

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New York Rangers

first NHL franchise in the US to win the Stanley Cup

Founded in 1926, the New York Rangers franchise is one of what is known as the National Hockey League’s Original Six. The Rangers have had a tumultuous history. The team is the first NHL franchise in the United States to win the Stanley Cup. It also endured a 54-year drought (1940 to 1994) between its third and fourth Cup wins. Amid it all, many legends of the game—including Bill Cook, Andy Bathgate, Rod Gilbert and Brian Leetch—have worn the iconic Rangers sweater.

VS Montreal Maroons

The Rangers win their first Stanley Cup title, defeating the Montreal Maroons in five games in the best-of-five final round of the playoffs. The Cup victory is the second by an American team—the first being the Seattle Metropolitans in 1917. The series includes one of the most remarkable incidents in NHL playoff history: Rangers coach Lester Patrick dons the pads when Lorne Chabot, the team’s goaltender, leaves the game with an eye injury. The 44-year-old Patrick backstops the Rangers to an overtime victory, and remains the oldest man to play in a Stanley Cup final.

VS TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS

The Rangers and Leafs face off in a rematch of the 1932 final. This time the Rangers emerge victorious, defeating the Leafs in four games in the best-of-five series.

VS Toronto Maple Leafs

The Rangers win the Stanley Cup, defeating the Toronto Maple Leafs in six games in the final round. It is the club’s third Cup triumph in the team’s brief history. The Rangers go 54 years before hoisting the Cup again. Fans have a reason why the club goes 54 years without winning the Cup: the team was cursed. The curse of 1940, also known as Dutton’s curse, has two origins. One stems from the mortgage of Madison Square Garden—the team’s home arena—being burned in the bowl of the Cup, which had most recently been won by the Rangers. Some fans believed hockey’s most sacred object had been desecrated and the Rangers cursed by the hockey gods. The other origin story involves former New York Americans coach and general manager Red Dutton, who believed the NHL, with the encouragement of Madison Square Garden officials, reneged on a promise to revive the defunct Americans following the Second World War. Dutton declared that the betrayal would mean the Rangers would not win the Cup again for as long as he lived. They never did.

VS Vancouver Canucks

The Rangers defeat the Vancouver Canucks in a thrilling seven-game final-round series, winning the Stanley Cup and ending 54 years of frustration for Rangers fans. New York defenceman Brian Leetch earns the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP, the first American-born player to achieve the honour.

 

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Ottawa Senators

The original Ottawa Senators were the first hockey club in Ontario

Ottawa has had hockey teams as far back as 1883, when a group participated in the Montreal Winter Carnival. Three years later, Ottawa became a founding member of the Amateur Hockey Association of Canada. In those early years, Ottawa’s representatives were known simply as Ottawa Hockey Club or Ottawas. That would change with Stanley Cup victories in 1903, 1904 and 1905. The public gave the team the name Silver Seven after a member of the club’s management distributed silver coins to each player to recognize the squad’s success. After this three-year reign atop the hockey world, the club became known as the Senators. But don’t confuse this franchise with the modern-day one. After the 1933-34 season, the franchise moved to St. Louis, but not before the Stanley Cup resided in Ottawa—its birthplace—11 times in the span of a quarter century.

VS Montreal Victorias

In March, Ottawa defeats the Montreal Victorias in a two-game total-goals series to claim the Stanley Cup for the first time. Later that month, the team defends its title with a similar win over the Rat Portage (later Kenora) Thistles. The Senators become widely known as the Silver Seven when all seven players are given a silver nugget after the team wins the Cup.

VS Winnipeg Rowing Club

In January, Ottawa defends its Stanley Cup title with a victory over the Winnipeg Rowing Club. Ottawa beats the Winnipeg team in three games in a best-of-three series. Ottawa would defend the Cup three more times that winter, defeating challengers from Toronto, Montreal and Brandon. Many of the team’s games in defence of the Cup took place in the Aberdeen Pavilion. The distinctive structure, situated at the heart of the city’s Lansdowne Park, stands to this day.

VS Dawson City Nuggets

In January, the Dawson City Nuggets arrive in Ottawa, after making a month-long journey from their Yukon home, to challenge the Senators for the Stanley Cup. The Senators give the Nuggets a rude welcome, routing the Dawson City squad. Ottawa not only sweeps the best-of-three series, but also outscores the Nuggets 32–4. Ottawa’s Frank McGee scores 14 goals in the second game—a 23–2 victory for the Senators. In March, Ottawa would defend its title again—this time defeating the Rat Portage (later Kenora) Thistles in three games in a best-of-three series.

VS Queen’s University

Ottawa played two Stanley Cup challenges during the year, sweeping Queen’s University in a best-of-three series in February and doing the same to Smiths Falls in early March. The Montreal Wanderers would snatch the Cup away from Ottawa later in the month, defeating the Senators in a two-game total-goals series after the two teams tied for first place in the Eastern Canada Amateur Hockey Association regular season.

Stanley Cup Champions

Ottawa captures the Eastern Canada Hockey Association regular season crown and with it the Stanley Cup.

VS Edmonton Hockey Club

In January, Ottawa defeats a challenge from a team from Galt, champions of the Ontario Professional Hockey League, in a two-game total-goals series. Later that month, the Senators would defend their title against the Edmonton Hockey Club in a similar series.

Vs Galt and Port Arthur

In March, Ottawa captures the National Hockey Association regular season crown and with it the Stanley Cup. Later that month, the club defends its title with victories over challengers from Galt and Port Arthur.

VS Seattle Metropolitans

The Senators defeat the Seattle Metropolitans in five games in a best-of-five series to capture the Stanley Cup. Seattle’s appearance in the Cup championship would be the last by a team from the United States West Coast until 1993, when the Los Angeles Kings lost to the Montreal Canadiens.

VS Vancouver Millionaires

The Senators win their second of back-to-back Stanley Cup triumphs, defeating the Vancouver Millionaires in five games in a best-of-five series. Hockey historians indicate that Ottawa mayor Frank Plant asked officials at the Ottawa Dairy Company to allow Jack Darragh, Ottawa forward and a dairy company employee, to travel to Vancouver and play in the series. Darragh would lead the final round in goals, with five, including both goals in the Senators 2-1 deciding-game victory.

VS Edmonton Eskimos

The Senators defeat the Edmonton Eskimos of the West Coast Hockey League, sweeping the Eskimos in a best-of-three series. In the second game, Ottawa’s Frank “King” Clancy plays all six positions on the ice, including goalie, when the team’s regular netminder, Clint Benedict, serves a minor penalty for slashing.

VS Boston Bruins

1927: In the first final between teams from the National Hockey League, the Senators defeat the Boston Bruins to win the Stanley Cup. The final round is intended to be a best-of-three series, but when the first game is declared a tie, National Hockey League president Frank Calder states that the series will go no longer than five games, with tie games limited to 20 minutes of overtime. The president further states that if the teams are tied after five games, the two finalists will share the Cup. Ottawa triumphs in the best-of-three series in four games, winning two games and drawing the other two. The Cup victory would be the last for the Senators. It would be another 80 years before a team from Ottawa would reach the Stanley Cup final again.

 

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Philadelphia Flyers

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The Flyers were known as the Broad Street Bullies

The Philadelphia Flyers are one of the six teams that joined the National Hockey League as part of the league’s expansion from six to 12 teams in 1967. With the arrival of the Flyers, NHL hockey returned to the City of Brotherly Love for the first time since 1931 and the single season of the Philadelphia Quakers. For much of the 1970s, the Flyers were known as the Broad Street Bullies, the name derived from their physically intimidating style of play and the location of the team’s home arena—the Spectrum.

PHILADELPHIA FLYERS VS. BOSTON BRUINS

In just the team’s seventh year of existence, the Flyers become the first of the six 1967 expansion teams to win the Stanley Cup, defeating the Boston Bruins in the final round in six games. Flyers goalie Bernie Parent earns the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP.

PHILADELPHIA FLYERS VS. BUFFALO SABRES

Philadelphia wins its second of back-to-back Stanley Cups, again winning the final round in six games—this time over the Buffalo Sabres. Game four of the final is a memorable one, as it is halted to clear fog that shrouds the ice surface. Flyers goalie Bernie Parent takes home the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP for the second straight year, the first player to win the award in consecutive seasons.

 

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Pittsburgh Penguins

the Penguins are the most successful

The Pittsburgh Penguins are one of the six teams that joined the National Hockey League as part of the league’s expansion from six to 12 teams in 1967. Of these six, the Penguins are the most successful, having hoisted Lord Stanley’s mug five times.

PITTSBURGH PENGUINS VS. MINNESOTA NORTH STARS

The Penguins capture the Stanley Cup for the first time in franchise history, topping the Minnesota North Stars in six games in the final round. Pittsburgh captain Mario Lemieux earns the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP. In a year of firsts for the team, Penguins defenceman Jim Paek becomes the first Korean-born player to have his name engraved on the Stanley Cup.

PITTSBURGH PENGUINS VS. CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS

The Penguins sweep the Chicago Blackhawks in the final round to win their second straight Stanley Cup title. Pittsburgh captain Mario Lemieux earns the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP for the second year in a row. As a sign of the times to come, 1992 is the first year in which the NHL playoffs extend into the month of June.

PITTSBURGH PENGUINS VS. DETROIT RED WINGS

The Penguins rebound from defeat to the Detroit Red Wings in the 2008 Stanley Cup final to beat the Red Wings in seven games in the final playoff round and capture the Cup for the third time in franchise history. Evgeni Malkin is awarded the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP, becoming the first Russian-born player to win the trophy.

PITTSBURGH PENGUINS VS. SAN JOSE SHARKS

The Penguins defeat the San Jose Sharks in six games in the final round to win the Stanley Cup. Pittsburgh captain Sidney Crosby earns the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP, while goaltender Matt Murray backstops the team to 15 wins in the playoffs, tying the record for most goaltending wins by a rookie.

PITTSBURGH PENGUINS VS. NASHVILLE PREDATORS

The Penguins win their second straight Stanley Cup title, defeating the Nashville Predators in six games in the final round. Pittsburgh captain Sidney Crosby earns the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP for the second year in a row. Not to be outdone, Penguins goalie Matt Murray backstops the club to victory in both 2016 and 2017—that’s two Cup wins for a player just wrapping up what is officially his rookie season.

 

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Quebec Bulldogs

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one of the first organized hockey teams in Canada

The Quebec Bulldogs were one of the first organized hockey teams in Canada. Founded in 1878, the team was known formally as the Quebec Hockey Club and would play in various leagues until 1909. In that year, the club turned professional, joining the Canadian Hockey Association and then the National Hockey Association, the forerunner of the National Hockey League. At the close of the 1919–20 season, the Bulldogs move to Hamilton and become the Tigers. The Bulldogs featured one of the greatest goal scorers in the early history of the game: Joe Malone, who scored 14 goals in just three Stanley Cup playoff games.

QUEBEC BULLDOGS SWEEP THE MONCTON VICTORIAS

In March, the Bulldogs win the National Hockey Association regular season and are crowned Stanley Cup champions. That same month, the team retains the Cup, sweeping the Moncton Victorias in a best-of-three series.

QUEBEC BULLDOGS WIN NHA REGULAR SEASON

In March, the Bulldogs win the National Hockey Association regular season to retain control of the Cup. Within a week, the team defends its championship, defeating the Sydney Millionaires in a two-game total-goal playoff. Later that year, the Victoria Aristocrats defeat the Bulldogs in an exhibition series. The Quebec team retains the Cup after trustees don’t recognize the challenge, ruling that the best-of-three series should have been played in Quebec City.

 

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Seattle Metropolitans

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a legitimate Stanley Cup contender from the very start

Formed in 1915, the Seattle Metropolitans competed in the Pacific Coast Hockey Association. The team was a legitimate Stanley Cup contender from the very start, after signing five players from the 1914 Stanley Cup champion Toronto Blue Shirts. The team folded in 1924 when the Pacific Coast Hockey Association ceased operations.

SEATTLE METROPOLITANS VS. MONTREAL CANADIENS

The Metropolitans, winners of the Pacific Coast Hockey Association, defeat the Montreal Canadiens, winners of the National Hockey Association, to become the first American team to win the Stanley Cup.

The Metropolitans battle the Montreal Canadiens for the Stanley Cup, yet neither team emerges triumphant. The series is cancelled after five games (tied 2-2-1) due to the Spanish flu pandemic that sweeps the continent, sending five Canadiens players to hospital and claiming the life of Canadiens defenceman Joe Hall.

SEATTLE METROPOLITANS VS. MONTREAL CANADIENS

 

 

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Tampa Bay Lightning

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The Tampa Bay Lightning joined the NHL as an expansion team

The Tampa Bay Lightning joined the National Hockey League as an expansion team (alongside the Ottawa Senators), starting play in the 1992–93 NHL season. On September 23, 1992, Tampa Bay Lightning goaltender Manon Rhéaume became the first woman to play in any of the major professional sports leagues in North America when she slid between the pipes for a period in a pre-season game against the St. Louis Blues.

TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING VS. CALGARY FLAMES

The Tampa Bay Lightning defeat the Calgary Flames in seven games to capture the team’s first and only Stanley Cup title. Lightning forward Brad Richards is awarded the Conn Smythe Trophy as MVP of the playoffs. The team does not relinquish the Cup for two years, owing to the lockout that leads to the cancellation of the 2004–2005 NHL season.

 

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Toronto Blue Shirts

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a short-lived yet tumultuous existence

Founded in 1911 as the Toronto Hockey Club, the Blue Shirts (the name is also recorded as Blueshirts and Blue-Shirts) enjoyed a short-lived yet tumultuous existence. The club was at the centre of a controversy that led to the National Hockey Association suspending its operations and the team owners of that league forming a new one—the National Hockey League. While serving as prime minister, Stephen Harper wrote a book about the Blue Shirts and the instrumental role the team played in the rise of professional hockey and the formation of the NHL.

TORONTO BLUE SHIRTS VS. VICTORIA ARISTOCRATS

The Blue Shirts, champion of the National Hockey Association, beat the Victoria Aristocrats, champion of the Pacific Coast Hockey Association, to win the Stanley Cup. The Toronto club sweeps the Aristocrats in the best-of-five series. The 1914 face-off between the Blue Shirts and Aristocrats marks the end of the challenge era in Stanley Cup history, in which trustees of the Cup are responsible for sanctioning inter-league challenge series. Representatives of the National Hockey Association and Pacific Coast Hockey Association agree that from then on, each league’s respective champion will compete for the Stanley Cup.

 

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Toronto Maple Leafs

one of the most iconic franchises in the history of the NHL

The Toronto Maple Leafs is one of the most iconic franchises in the history of the National Hockey League. Yet, surprisingly enough, the franchise has undergone three incarnations. It was founded in 1917 as the Toronto Arenas. Two years later, ownership of the franchise was transferred, with the new owners dubbing the team the St. Patrick’s—after originally calling their new team the Tecumsehs. The franchise was sold again in 1927 and renamed the Toronto Maple Leaf Hockey Club. The Maple Leafs were born. Since then, many legends of the game, including Charlie Conacher, Ted Kennedy, Frank Mahovlich, Johnny Bower, Darryl Sittler and Doug Gilmour, have worn the blue and white.

TORONTO ARENAS VS. VANCOUVER MILLIONAIRES

Toronto Arenas—predecessor of the Toronto Maple Leafs—win the Stanley Cup, defeating the Pacific Coast Hockey Association champion Vancouver Millionaires in five games in a five-game series. It marks the first time a National Hockey League team—the Arenas—competes for the Cup, and the first Cup win by an NHL franchise from Toronto.

TORONTO ST. PATRICK’S VS. VANCOUVER MILLIONAIRES

Toronto St. Patrick’s—predecessor of the Toronto Maple Leafs—win the Stanley Cup, defeating the Pacific Coast Hockey Association champion Vancouver Millionaires in five games in a five-game series. It is the only Cup triumph for the Toronto club as the St. Patrick’s and the last time the Cup final is contested by a team from Vancouver until 1982.

TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS VS. NEW YORK RANGERS

Toronto sweeps the New York Rangers in a best-of-five final-round series to win the Stanley Cup. While the Toronto franchise had won the Cup before, this year marks the first time it triumphs as the Maple Leafs. On a much less important historical note, the series is known as the tennis series, as the Leafs win the three-game match-up by scores of 6–4, 6–2 and 6–4.

TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS VS. DETROIT RED WINGS

Toronto defeats the Detroit Red Wings in a seven-game final-round series to capture the Stanley Cup. It’s no ordinary final. The Leafs rally from a three games to none deficit to win four straight games, making it the greatest comeback in Stanley Cup final history.

TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS VS. DETROIT RED WINGS

Toronto prevails over the Detroit Red Wings in seven games in the final round of the playoffs to claim the Stanley Cup. It’s a seesaw battle. After winning the first three games of the final, Detroit rebounds to win the next three, before the Leafs triumph in the deciding game by a goal.

TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS VS. MONTREAL CANADIENS

Toronto tops the Montreal Canadiens in a six-game final-round series to claim the Stanley Cup. The Leafs win is the first in what would turn out to be three consecutive Cup triumphs.

TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS VS. DETROIT RED WINGS

Toronto defeats the Detroit Red Wings, sweeping the Detroit club in the final round. The Leafs win is the second in what would turn out to be three consecutive Cup triumphs.

TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS VS. DETROIT RED WINGS

Toronto sweeps the Detroit Red Wings in the final round to become the first team to win the Stanley Cup three straight seasons.

TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS VS. MONTREAL CANADIENS

Toronto wins the Stanley Cup as Maple Leafs defenceman Bill Barilko scores the Cup-winning goal in the first overtime period of game five. The series is closer than it sounds, with all five games between the triumphant Leafs and the Canadiens decided in overtime. Fans of The Tragically Hip know the story of Toronto’s Stanley Cup win in 1951. Barilko’s historic tally is the last goal he ever scores. The blueliner disappears that summer while returning home from a fishing trip. As the song goes, the Leafs don’t win another Cup until 1962, the year the wreckage of his plane is discovered.

TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS VS. CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS

Toronto wins its first Stanley Cup since 1951, beating the defeating champion Chicago Blackhawks in six games in the final round. The Cup win is the first of three in a row for the Leafs.

TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS VS. MONTREAL CANADIENS

Backstopped by 39-year-old netminder Johnny Bower, the Maple Leafs roll to their second Stanley Cup victory in as many seasons, ousting the Montreal Canadiens in the semi-final round in five games, then dispatching the Detroit Red Wings in the final round in five games.

TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS VS. DETROIT RED WINGS

Toronto beats the Detroit Red Wings in a thrilling seven-game final-round series to win a third straight Stanley Cup title. Following the series, fans learn that Leafs defenceman Bobby Baun played—and scored the overtime winner in game six—with a broken bone in his foot.

TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS VS. MONTREAL CANADIENS

The Maple Leafs capture the Stanley Cup, defeating the Montreal Canadiens in six games in the final round. Toronto’s win marks the end of the Original Six era in National Hockey League history. Leafs forward Dave Keon is awarded the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP.

 

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Vancouver Millionaires

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Founded in 1911

Founded in 1911, the Vancouver Millionaires competed in the Pacific Coast Hockey Association and Western Canada Hockey League until 1926. In 1922, the team would change its name from Millionaires to Maroons. In 2010, the Vancouver Canucks purchased the rights to the Millionaires name and logo. The Canucks have donned the Millionaires sweaters on at least three occasions since, including on March 26, 2015—the one-hundredth anniversary of the Millionaires Stanley Cup triumph.

VANCOUVER MILLIONAIRES VS. OTTAWA SENATORS

Pacific Coast Hockey Association champion Vancouver Millionaires sweep the National Hockey Association champion Ottawa Senators in a best-of-five series to win the Stanley Cup. The victory by the Millionaires remains the only Stanley Cup championship by a team from Vancouver.

 

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Victoria Cougars

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The team’s existence would be short-lived

The Stanley Cup-winning version of the Victoria Cougars was founded in 1918 as the Victoria Aristocrats. In 1922, the team changed its name to the Cougars. The team’s existence would be short-lived, as the Western Hockey League and its franchises folded in 1926. The new Detroit franchise in the National Hockey League bought the rights to many of the Victoria Cougars players. The Detroiters even went so far as to adopt the Cougars nickname as their own. In 1932, the Detroit club would change its name to the Red Wings.

VICTORIA COUGARS VS. MONTREAL CANADIENS

Western Hockey League champion Victoria Cougars wins the Stanley Cup, beating the National Hockey League champion Montreal Canadiens in four games in a best-of-five series. The Cougars would be the last team not from the NHL to win the Stanley Cup.

 

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Winnipeg Victorias

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The Victorias remained an amateur team

Founded in 1889, the Winnipeg Victorias were an amateur team that played in the Manitoba Hockey Association. The Victorias remained an amateur team throughout its existence, winning the Allan Cup—as Canadian amateur champion—in 1911 and 1912.

WINNIPEG VICTORIAS VS. MONTREAL VICTORIAS

On February 14, Winnipeg defeats its namesake from Montreal—also named the Victorias—in a single-game challenge. In beating the defending Cup champions from Montreal, Winnipeg becomes the first team from outside the Amateur Hockey Association of Canada to hoist Lord Stanley’s mug. Hockey historians believe the 1896 Stanley Cup champion Winnipeg Victorias are the first team to celebrate a Cup win by holding a parade through city streets.

WINNIPEG VICTORIAS VS. MONTREAL SHAMROCKS

In January, Winnipeg challenges the Stanley Cup champion Montreal Shamrocks, sweeping the Montrealers in a best-of-three series.

WINNIPEG VICTORIAS VS. TORONTO WELLINGTONS

In January, Winnipeg accepts a Stanley Cup challenge from the Toronto Wellingtons, champion of the Ontario Hockey Association. The Victorias sweep the Wellingtons in a best-of-three series to retain the Cup.